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» Integrative & Sports Massage in Durango, La Plata, Bayfield & the Four Corners

“A Volunteers story”, 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia.

“The athletes whom we have provided pre, post, inter-event and flush sports massage work for the past two weeks have not only become connected with us for the physiological effects of the sports massage but we have become an integral to their emotional balance during competition. We have become their family for two weeks, not only for the physical support but the emotional support as well. We do bodywork on them for 20-30 minutes, one to three times per day. We have become the focal point of their wellbeing. The solace during incredibly intense days of competition. We have become the final integral component of their superstitious laden competition cycle.”

“The pay back for us, the Massage Therapist, comes when the athletes win, place and or their performance is a personal record. The frosting is provided when the athletes run in and give us a big hug, sometimes before they even meet the press. Hugs are great feedback! This past week during the rowing finals a similar situation occurred when another volunteer approached Eduardo, Sharon & I as we stood near the finish, where the athletes pass on their way to the medal stand. Noticing that we were receiving unsolicited hugs, she asked “how come you are so popular with the athletes?”

“Our final day of supporting one another, athletes, volunteers, and the local community. We watched the Italian boys and girls that we worked with over the past two weeks win three more medals today. Following, as our race view monitor panned away from the course and turned to the colored stars and stripes on the screen this final day which you hoped would never end, came to a close. A last chance to say ciao. Sharon, Eduardo & I slowly pulled ourselves away as the festivities continued, we departed, solemnly, not able to speak on the bus ride back to campus.”

It was evident in observing the success rate of teams that the ones that came in for massage as units were the ones that tended to medal or attained a personal or team best.

“Training programs, in order to be successful, must include pre-event, inter-event, post-event and flush massage in their competition schedule. At this moment, we are not even addressing Massage Therapy as integral to maintenance, injury prevention and injury rehabilitation of the competitive athlete. This is what the athletes will come to expect and it will become part of their competition and superstition. They will see that getting massage = optimal performance.”

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Functional foods that have an active component that helps to maintain and improves people’s health. FuXion extracts and concentrates these components to create beneficial, health, and delicious product.

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The masterful combination of these extracts, which complement and enhance by a multiplying effect- The FuXion X Effect! This creates an atmosphere for better absorption of vitamins and minerals. FuXion is FREE of chemicals and preservatives and is driven by 100% bioactive ingredients

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BIODIVERSITY IS THE MOVEMENT!!!

Excerpts from the APEC Summit 2016

This year’s Asian Pacific Economic Cooperative (APEC) Summit was held in Lima, Peru November 17th-19th, 2016. FuXion Founder Alvaro Zuniga Benavides shared a message of heritage and innovation with some of the most influential leaders in the world.

“Obama, Putin, Zuckerberg and many other world leaders met in Lima these past few days. One of the central themes they discussed is especially near and dear to us. We daily use and share this news.”

It was mentioned at the summit that this part of the world, the Amazon and Mesoamerica, has the greatest biodiversity on the planet and with technology and innovation, this heritage will make this world a better one…..

Just as the industrial revolution has come to pass and the information era is upon us, the future is opening up to the new age of biotechnology (technology that supports the biological process) and biodiversity is truly already here. Much is still undiscovered and will because of this will define a new moment in history. A moment in history where we go back to the basics, back to health, and this will be the SOURCE OF GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT…..”

Mmmm, interesting…..Why didn’t we think of this before?

Why FuXion Biotech is Leading the Movement

Mission

At FuXion we transform society through the families that live in True Health, by means of a business opportunity with unique products that integrate the millenary tradition of our cultures of origin and cutting edge biotechnology, generating a unique concept: Nutraceutical Fusion.

Vision

To be the best and biggest wellness organization of the world, offering a unique proposal of True Health, whose concept encompasses Physical, Financial and Emotional Health.

Values

Ethics and responsibility; Flexibility and adaptation to change, Will of Steel, Creativity, Leadership and Team work.

More Information on FuXion

http://usa.fuxion.net/
https://iamfuxion.net/loriannglass

A Quarter Century of Massage Thereapy


25 Years

Entering my 25th year in Massage Therapy what do I tell people? What do I write about? What wisdom of the ages do I impart? I am truly at a loss. I have recently had many conversations with clients about the past 25 years in Massage Therapy and what has changed. The following are some of those conversations which shed light on just how far we have come. Truthfully we have come as far as age of technology and the advancements in computers and the way we communicate through the internet.

Let’s start with the obvious. 25 years ago I was booking clients in pencil in a calendar book. This would happen either on the phone on a land line or in person. Now we book clients in colored blocks in our Google Calendar with the use of a keyboard. Appointments are made via land line, cell phone, email, text and in person.

That’s just the beginning, the tip of the iceberg so to speak. 25 years ago Massage Therapy schools were almost entirely privately owned as was the Connecticut Center for Massage Therapy (CCMT) where I graduated. The scales have turned as Massage Therapy programs have cropped up in community colleges, universities, have been created by or purchased by large educational conglomerates, and privately owned by a few steadfast owners/educators. My alma mater, CCMT, was purchased by the Steiner Education Group and has expanded from the one campus to three campuses statewide.

25 years ago the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB) was created. I was one of the original certificates’ in 1993 #2860. Also passed in 1992 was Connecticut’s Massage Therapy Licensure of which I was also an “original” with license #80. Now NCBTMB has certified over 90,000 Massage Therapists and the state of Connecticut has well over 2,000 Licensed Massage Therapists.

In the past 25 years we went from calling what we do as Massage Therapy to compartmentalizing our work to one or more massage or bodywork modalities. NCBTMB now recognizes over 200 different “touch” modalities practiced in the United States today. I still call what I do Massage Therapy, incorporating Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT), Myofascial Release (MFR), Lymphatic Drainage Therapy (LDT) , Therapeutic Stretching , Craniosacral Therapy (CST) , Therapeutic Exercise, Cross Fiber Friction, Deep Tissue, Sports Massage, etcetera. Over the 25 years I have been practicing I have been required by my professional organization, the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) and NCBTMB, to attain continuing education and I continually educate myself to the tune of an average of 100 continuing education units (CEU’s) per year.

Over the past 25 years the avenues of which we can practice Massage Therapy through greatly increased due public education and acceptance of Massage Therapy as a viable and mainstream form of health care. I personally have practiced in the spa industry, out of my house, a fitness center, a chiropractic center, an integrative health care center (which I owned), a hospital, and currently as a private practice, Glass & Glass Bodywork, Integrative Bodywork.

This is truly is only the beginning, the tip of the iceberg, as Massage Therapy becomes more and more accepted, dispelling the myths of massage as only for the “Rich and Pampered” as the title of a newspaper article I was interviewed for back in 1993 would suggest. As more and more medically based research is devoted to the effects of Massage Therapy. This will create more and more efficacy for the use of massage as a healing and rehabilitative modality. As Massage Therapy shows up more and more in the public eye the more commonplace receiving massage will be. When was the last time you saw a massage concession at an airport? The more people see it, read about it, receive it and talk about it, the more our profession will grow over the next 25 years.

Move it or Lose it: Part II

Massage has become an integral part of the new athletic regimen from sports medicine clinics, to college training rooms, to professional locker rooms to Olympic training. Growing number of trainers believe that massage can provide an extra edge to the athletes who participate in high performance sports. Massage has become a necessary ingredient for a complete workout. More and more people are realizing that a complete workout routine includes not only the exercise itself, but also caring for the wear-and-tear and minor injuries that naturally occur with strenuous movement. The physiological and psychological benefits of massage make it an ideal complement to a total conditioning program.

Anyone who routinely stretches their physical limits through movement such as running, cycling, mountain biking, hiking, skiing, skating, sledding, swimming, dancing, strength training and aerobics, etcetera, etcetera, can benefit from a massage. There are others who do strenuous activities in a day that is not normally classified as exercise. Examples are mothers with small children, gardeners, and others who use their bodies strenuously in their work.

Incorporating massage in your conditioning program has many benefits. It helps you get into good shape faster, and with less stiffness and soreness. It helps you recover faster from heavy workouts, and relieves conditions which may cause injury.

What Happens When You Exercise?

Regular exercise increases vigor and promotes a general sense of well-being. If done in moderation, it can help relieve the effects of stress, and has been linked to decrease in psychological depression.

Regular exercise produces positive physical results like increased muscular strength and endurance, more efficient heart and respiratory functioning, and greater flexibility.

These positive physical changes occur as the body gradually adapts to the greater demands put on it by regular exercise. The body improves its functioning to meet the challenges placed on it.

Conditioning involves three steps or phases:

  • Tearing Down Phase when one pushes the physical limits
  • Recovery Phase - Important for the rebuilding phase and to obtain the full benefits of a conditioning program, and
  • Buildup Phase - when the system adapts to the new demands placed on it.

The 'tearing down' phase of the adaptation process often involves stiffness and soreness, especially when the amount of movement is significantly increased from what the body has been used to in the past.

Delayed muscle soreness (24-48 hours after exercise) may be caused by any of a number of different factors. Some possible causes are minor muscle or connective tissue damage, local muscle spasms that reduce blood flow or a buildup of waste products (metabolites) from energy production.

Trigger points or stress points may also cause muscle soreness and decreased flexibility. These points are specific spots in muscle and tendons which cause pain when pressed, and which may radiate pain to a larger area. They are not bruises, but are thought by some to be small areas of spasm. Trigger points may be caused by sudden trauma (like falling or being hit), or may develop over time from the stress and strain of heavy physical exertion or from repeated use of a particular muscle.

Heavily exercised muscles may also lose their capacity to relax, causing chronically tight (hypertonic) muscles, and loss of flexibility. Lack of flexibility is often linked to muscle soreness, and predisposes you to injuries, especially muscle pulls and tears. Blood flow through tight muscles is poor (ischemia), which also causes pain.

How Does Massage Help?

Recovery

Therapeutic massage helps the body recover from the stresses of strenuous exercise, and facilitates the rebuilding phase of conditioning. The physiological benefits of massage include improved blood and lymph circulation, muscle relaxation, and general relaxation. These, in turn, lead to removal of waste products and better cell nutrition, normalization and greater elasticity of tissues, deactivation of trigger points, and faster healing of injuries. It all adds up to relief from soreness and stiffness, better flexibility, and less potential for future injury.

In addition to general recovery, massage may also focus on specific muscles used in a sport or fitness activity. For example, areas of greater stress for runners and dancers are in the legs, for swimmers in the upper body, for tennis players in the arms. These areas are more likely to be tight, lose flexibility, and develop trigger points.

Over-training

Adequate recovery is also a major factor in avoiding the over-training syndrome. Over-training is characterized by irritability, apathy, altered appetite, increased frequency of injury, increased resting heart rate, and/or insomnia. It occurs when the body is not allowed to recover adequately between bouts of heavy exercise. Therapeutic massage helps you avoid over-training by facilitating recovery through general relaxation, and its other physiological effects.

Trouble spots

You may also have your own unique trouble spots, perhaps from past injuries. A massage therapist can pay special attention to these areas, monitor them for developing problems, and help keep them in good condition. An experienced massage therapist can also compliment treatment received from other health care professionals for various injuries. You may also have your own unique trouble spots, perhaps from past injuries. A massage therapist can pay special attention to these areas, monitor them for developing problems, and help keep them in good condition. An experienced massage therapist can also compliment treatment received from other health care professionals for various injuries.

4 Independent Areas of Sports massage

  1. Event Sports Massage:
    • Pre-Event Sports Massage
    • Inter Event Sports Massage
    • Post-Event Sports Massage
  2. Flush Massage
  3. Maintenance Sports Massage
  4. Injury and Rehabilitative Sports Massage

Maintenance Massage

An effective maintenance program is based on the massage therapist's understanding of anatomy and kinesiology, combined with an expert knowledge of which muscles are used in a given sport and which are likely candidates for trouble. By zeroing in on particular muscle groups and working specific tissues, the sports massage therapist can help the athlete maintain or improve range of motion and muscle flexibility. The overall objective of a maintenance program is to help the athlete reach optimal performance through injury-free training.

Event Massage

Pre-event sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete's warm-up to enhance circulation and reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter (10-15 minutes) than a regular conditioning massage, and focuses on warming-up the major muscles to be used, and getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition. It also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete, and others can be stimulating. Pre-event sports massage is given within the four hours preceding an event to improve performance and help decrease injuries. It is used as a supplement to an athlete's warm-up to enhance circulation and reduce excess muscle and mental tension prior to competition. It is normally shorter (10-15 minutes) than a regular conditioning massage, and focuses on warming-up the major muscles to be used, and getting the athlete in a good mental state for competition. It also improves tissue pliability, readying the athlete for top performance. Certain massage techniques can help calm a nervous athlete, and others can be stimulating.

Inter/Intra-event

Inter- and intra-event massage is given between events or in time-outs to help athletes recover from the preceding activity, and prepare for the activity coming up. It is also short, and focuses on the major muscles stressed in the activity. Inter- and intra-event massage is given between events or in time-outs to help athletes recover from the preceding activity, and prepare for the activity coming up. It is also short, and focuses on the major muscles stressed in the activity.

Post-event

Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly concerned with recovery. It is geared toward reducing the muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occur with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session might be 15 minutes to 11/2 hours in length. Post-event sports massage is given after a competition and is mainly concerned with recovery. It is geared toward reducing the muscle spasms and metabolic build-up that occur with vigorous exercise. Recovery after competition involves not only tissue normalization and repair, but also general relaxation and mental calming. A recovery session might be 15 minutes to 11/2 hours in length.

Recovery Sports Massage

"The intent of recovery sport massage is to reduce soreness, restore blood flow, increase range of motion, promote lymphatic drainage, and restore balance and a sense of well-being." Michael McGillicuddy

Injury & Rehabilitation Massage

Even with preventive maintenance, muscles cramp, tear, bruise, and ache. Sports massage can speed healing and reduce discomfort during the rehabilitation process.

Soft tissue techniques employed by sports massage therapists are effective in the management of both acute and chronic injuries. For example, adding lymphatic massage to the "standard care" procedure in the acute stage of injury will improve control of secondary, hypoxic injury and enhance fluid removal throughout the healing cycle.

In all cases, such massage techniques are employed in collaboration with other appropriate medical care. For example, encouraging circulation around a bruise, but not directly on it, through the use of compression, cross-fiber techniques or even long, deep strokes is only used after appropriate medical referral and diagnostics indicate that there are no clots formed in the area which may embolize.

Injury Related Sports Massage Techniques

Each sport and athletic event uses muscle groups in a different way. Sports massage therapists must be familiar with each muscle, the muscle groups and how they are affected by the specific movements and stresses of each sport. They also are trained in the appropriate uses of hydrotherapy and cryotherapy.

Traditional western (e.g. Swedish) massage is currently the most common approach used for conditioning programs. It is frequently supplemented by other massage therapy approaches including deep tissue, trigger point work, and acupressure. Some massage therapists have special training in sports massage and greater experience working with athletes.

Injury Related Sports Massage Therapy frequently includes the use of one or more of the following techniques:

NMT: This comprehensive program of soft-tissue manipulation balances the body’s central nervous system with the musculoskeletal system. Based on neurological laws that explain how the central nervous system initiates and maintains pain, the goal is to help relieve the pain and dysfunction by understanding and alleviating the underlying cause. Neuromuscular therapy can help individuals who experience distortion and biomechanical dysfunction, which is often a symptom of a deeper problem. It is also used to locate and release spasms and hypercontraction in the tissue, eliminate trigger points that cause referred pain, rebuild the strength of injured tissues, assist venous and lymphatic flow, and restore postural alignment, proper biomechanics, and flexibility to the tissues.

MFR: Myofascial release is the three-dimensional application of sustained pressure and movement into the fascial system in order to eliminate fascial restrictions and facilitate the emergence of emotional patterns and belief systems that are no longer relevant or are impeding progress. First, an assessment is made by visually analyzing the human frame, followed by the palpation of the tissue texture of various fascial layers. Upon locating an area of fascial tension, gentle pressure is applied in the direction of the restriction. Myofascial release is an effective therapeutic approach in the relief of cervical pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, scoliosis, neurological dysfunction, restriction of motion, chronic pain, and headaches.

TPT: Trigger point massage therapy is specifically designed to alleviate the source of the pain through cycles of isolated pressure and release. In this type of massage for trigger point therapy, the recipient actively participates through deep breathing as well as identifying the exact location and intensity of the discomfort.

The results and benefits of trigger point massage are releasing constricted areas in the muscles thus alleviating pain. You can experience a significant decrease in pain after just one treatment. Receiving massage with trigger point therapy on a regular basis can help naturally manage pain and stress from chronic injuries.

Therapeutic Stretching: We incorporate one of the following stretching techniques with our clients:

  • Active Isolated Stretching (AI): Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) is one of the methods of stretching most used by today's athletes, massage therapists, personal/athletic trainers, and professionals. Active Isolated Stretching allows the body to repair itself and also to prepare for daily activity. The Active Isolated Stretching technique involves the method of holding each stretch for only two seconds. This method of stretching is also known to work with the body's natural physiological makeup to improve circulation and increase the elasticity of muscle joints and fascia. There are several ways of learning about Active Isolated Stretching (AIS).
  • Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF): is a set of stretching techniques commonly used in clinical environments to enhance both active and passive range of motion with the ultimate goal being to optimize motor performance and rehabilitation.
  • Static Stretching: is used to stretch muscles while the body is at rest. It is composed of various techniques that gradually lengthen a muscle to an elongated position (to the point of discomfort) and hold that position for 30 seconds to two minutes. 30 seconds is the minimum duration to get the benefits of stretching, whereas two minutes is the maximum (if a position can be held for more than two minutes, a farther stretch should be performed).

Therapeutic Exercise: DeLateur defined therapeutic exercise as bodily movement prescribed to correct impairment, improve musculoskeletal function, or maintain a state of well-being. It may vary from highly selected activities restricted to specific muscles or parts of the body, to general and vigorous activities that can return a convalescing patient to the peak of physical condition. Therapeutic exercise seeks to accomplish the following goals:

  • Enable ambulation
  • Release contracted muscles, tendons, and fascia
  • Mobilize joints
  • Improve circulation
  • Improve respiratory capacity
  • Improve coordination
  • Reduce rigidity
  • Improve balance
  • Promote relaxation
  • Improve muscle strength and, if possible, achieve and maintain maximal voluntary contractile force (MVC)
  • Improve exercise performance and functional capacity (endurance)

CST: Craniosacral therapy is a gentle, noninvasive method of evaluating and enhancing the function of a physiological body arrangement called the craniosacral system. Developed by John E. Upledger, DO, OMM, this manual therapy enhances the body’s natural healing processes and has proven effective in treating a wide range of medical problems associated with pain and dysfunction. The roots of this therapy are in cranial osteopathy, developed by Dr. William G. Sutherland. The craniosacral system consists of the membranes and cerebrospinal fluid that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord. It extends from the bones of the skull, face, and mouth--which make up the cranium--down to the sacrum or tailbone. Since this system influences the development and function of the brain and spinal cord, any imbalance or dysfunction in the craniosacral system could cause sensory, motor, or neurological disabilities. These problems may include chronic pain, eye difficulties, scoliosis, motor-coordination impairments, learning disabilities, and other dysfunctions of the central nervous system. Craniosacral therapy encourages the body’s natural healing mechanisms to improve the functioning of the central nervous system, dissipate the negative effects of stress, and enhance health and resistance to disease. The craniosacral therapy practitioner uses a light touch to assist the natural movement of fluid within the craniosacral system. Therapists generally use only five grams of pressure, roughly the weight of a nickel, to test for restrictions in various parts of the craniosacral system. It’s often possible for the evaluation alone to remove the restriction and allow the system to correct itself.

CFF: Developed for the treatment of soft tissue lesions by the British osteopath, Dr. James Cyriax, deep transverse friction effectively reduces fibrosis and encourages the formation of strong, pliable scar tissue at the site of healing injuries. This technique, also known as cross-fiber frictioning, reduces the crystalline roughness that forms between tendons and their sheaths that can result in painful tendonitis. It can also prevent or soften myofascial adhesions.

LDT: Lymph Drainage Therapy (LDT) is unique in that healthcare professionals learn how to palpate the lymphatic flow. As they develop their skills, they can then identify the rhythm, direction, and quality of the lymphatic flow. Advanced practitioners will be able to precisely map the lymphatic flow to find alternate pathways for drainage. Developed by Bruno Chikly, MD, Lymph Drainage Therapy evolved from years of training in traditional medicine, Asian medical practices, and manual therapies. (Definition provided by The Upledger Institute.)

Therapeutic Exercise: DeLateur defined therapeutic exercise as bodily movement prescribed to correct impairment, improve musculoskeletal function, or maintain a state of well-being. It may vary from highly selected activities restricted to specific muscles or parts of the body, to general and vigorous activities that can return a convalescing patient to the peak of physical condition. Therapeutic exercise seeks to accomplish the following goals:

  • Enable ambulation
  • Release contracted muscles, tendons, and fascia
  • Mobilize joints
  • Improve circulation
  • Improve respiratory capacity
  • Improve coordination
  • Reduce rigidity
  • Improve balance
  • Promote relaxation
  • Improve muscle strength and, if possible, achieve and maintain maximal voluntary contractile force (MVC)
  • Improve exercise performance and functional capacity (endurance)

In Conclusion

Sports massage is integral in an athlete’s ability to be “as good as possible, as safe as possible for as long as possible.” ‘Sports Massage will support maintaining top physical condition, aid in injury prevention, help to restore mobility, boost performance, restore mobility of injured soft tissue and extend both good health and the overall competitive life of an athlete.’ Jack Meagher

http://holisticonline.com/massage/mas_sports.htm
www.abmp.com

MOVE IT OR LOSE IT PART I!

Introduction by George

I have always used the expression “move it or lose it” with my clients over the 23 years I have practiced massage therapy. I used the expression often enough that folks said that I should have t-shirts made up with the phrase printed on the back. Although I have preached this over and over again throughout the years I never really found compelling physiological evidence supporting this stance. I mean compelling evidence supporting the position that all people should be in perpetual motion throughout the day. Not supporting evidence that one should “work out” in order to remain healthy but actually moving, not sitting. Now I have the backing of research and a rather profound article written by Dr. Mercola for Peak Fitness. This article not only gives efficacy to the notion that we should be moving throughout our day but it also gives some great, and simplistic movements that we can practice anytime, anywhere.


By Dr. Mercola

Over 50 percent of American men, and 60 percent of American women, never engage in any vigorous physical activity lasting more than 10 minutes per week.1 This despite a growing body of research clearly showing that "exercise deficiency" threatens your overall health and mental well-being, and shortens your lifespan.

That said, even if you fall into the other half of the population that exercises or are even a highly competitive and fit athlete, you may still endanger your health simply by sitting too much.

For example, one 2012 analysis2 that looked at the findings from 18 studies found that those who sat for the longest periods of time were twice as likely to have diabetes or heart disease, compared to those who sat the least. Worse yet, it appears that temporary vigorous exercise can't even compensate for the damage incurred by prolonged daily sitting!

In fact, it's becoming increasingly clear that staying active—and by that I mean engaging in virtually any physical movement—as much as possible, throughout the day, is critical for health and longevity. It even appears to be more important, in the big scheme of things, than a regularly scheduled fitness routine...

Sitting Down Too Much Raises Your Risk of Heart Failure

Besides increasing your risk of metabolic problems, researchers warn that the combination of sitting too much and exercising too little can more than double the risk of heart failure in men. As reported by USA Today:

"The risk of heart failure was more than double for men who sat for at least five hours a day outside of work and didn't exercise very much compared with men who were physically active and sat for less than two hours a day... The risk was lowest for men who exercised the most and sat for fewer than two hours a day...

Government statistics show almost half of people report sitting more than six hours a day, and 65 percent say they spend more than two hours a day watching TV. 'If you've been sitting for an hour, you've been sitting too long,' says James Levine, co-director of Obesity Solutions at Mayo Clinic in Phoenix and Arizona State University."

This study6 also confirms the alarming findings of earlier ones, which is that a regular fitness routine does NOT counteract the effects of prolonged sitting. The study—which followed more than 82,000 men for 10 years—found that these risk correlations held true no matter how much they exercised!

Last summer, I interviewed Dr. Joan Vernikos, former director of NASA's Life Sciences Division and author of Sitting Kills, Moving Heals, about the hazards of chronic sitting, and how to avoid succumbing to its ill effects. Her research has revealed there's a simple answer.

The key is to make sure you move your body frequently throughout the day. The act of standing up from a seated position has been found particularly effective at counteracting the detrimental health effects of sitting.

I firmly believe that a reasonable goal is to get up four times every hour or every 15 minutes while you are sitting. Once you are engaged in a project, it is really difficult to remember to do this so an alarm might be helpful.

I personally use XNote timer that can be downloaded for free. Once you download the program you can go to the "More" section at the bottom of the program and click "Always On Top" so the application doesn't get buried on your computer.

You should then click on "Timer" and set it to 15 minutes. You may then click "Start" and when the timer goes off there will not be an alarm sounded, but a flash will appear on your screen to remind you to stand up and perform the exercises.

Like everything in life it is a matter of making choices. I spend 8-12 hours a day in front of a computer. There are certainly times when I am in the flow and choose not to stand up but for the most part that is a rare occasion.

I welcome the interruption and delight in the fact knowing that I am giving my body a break from the abuse of constant sitting and I love it when I move and feel my joints crack and get more flexibility as I know this habit of providing motion to my body will let me function pain free for decades to come.

At-Work 'Workouts' — A Practical Health Intervention

The easiest and simplest strategy is to merely stand up, and then sit back down. But the evidence suggests you'd be wise to go a little further—especially if you only exercise a few times a week, or not at all. There are plenty of ways to get movement in during your work hours. The following videos, featuring Jill Rodriguez, offer a series of helpful intermittent movement beginner exercises you can do right at your desk. For a demonstration of each technique, please see the corresponding video in the table below. I suggest taking a break to do one set of three exercises, anywhere from once every 15 minutes, to once per hour.

Technique #1: Standing Neck-Stretch: Hold for 20 seconds on each side.

Technique #2: Shoulder Blade Squeeze: Round your shoulders, then pull them back and pull down. Repeat for 20-30 seconds.

Technique #3: Standing Hip Stretch: Holding on to your desk, cross your left leg over your right thigh and "sit down" by bending your right leg. Repeat on the other side.

Technique #4: The Windmill: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, then pivot your feet to the right. Push your hip out to the left. Raising your left arm skyward, and your right arm toward the floor, lower your body toward the floor while looking up, then raise your torso back to standing position. Repeat on the other side.

Technique #5: Side Lunge: Starting with your feet together, take a medium step sideways, and bend down as if you're about to sit. Use your arms for balance by reaching out in front of you. Return to starting position, and repeat 10-20 times. Repeat on the other side.

Technique #6: Desk Push-Up: Place hand a little wider than shoulder-width apart on your desk. Come up on your toes to make it easier to tip forward. Do 10 repetitions.

Technique #7: Squat to Chair: With your feet shoulder-width apart, sit down, reaching forward with your hands, and stand back up in quick succession. Do 15-20 repetitions.

Technique #8: Single Leg Dead Lift: Place your right hand on your desk, and place your weight on your right leg. Fold your torso forward, while simultaneously lifting your left leg backward. Do 10 repetitions on each side.

Technique #9: Mountain Climber: Get into a push-up position on the floor. Pull your right knee forward to touch your right wrist or arm, and then return to push-up position. Repeat on the other side. Try to pick up the pace, and do 20 quick repetitions.

Exercizes

Advanced Intermittent Movement Routine

The video below from Dr. Eric Goodman is just over 4 minutes, but you can break it up into 30-60 second sections and perform it on one of your breaks.

Below are some more advanced suggestions from fitness expert Lisa Huck. These movements are the ones I'm currently working with to interrupt my sitting. I suggest bookmarking this article so you can easily find all of these helpful videos, demonstratingeach movement. Again, ideally you'll want to do at least one of these exercises every 15 minutes. Alternatively, you can combine two or three in a three-minute break once or twice every hour.

The more frequently you get out of your seat, the better, because the frequency is the most important aspect. Based on double-blind research conducted by Dr. Vernikos, the minimum number of times you need to interrupt your sitting in order to counteract its cardiovascular health risks is in the neighborhood of 35 times per day.

Her research clearly shows that sitting down and standing up repeatedly for 35 minutes does NOT have the same effect as standing up once, 35 times over the course of the entire day. In order to be effective, the activity needs to be spread out. This helps explain why vigorously exercising a few times a week still isn't enough to counteract the ill effects of daily prolonged sitting.

#1: Standing Hip Flexor Stretch
#2: Standing Calf Stretch
#3: Standing Inner Thigh Stretch
#4: Standing Back/Buttocks Stretch
#5: Kneeling Lunge Matrix
#6: Hip Flexor, Hamstring, and Quad Stretch
#7: Side Line Twisting Back Stretch
#8: Chest Stretch
#9: Back Butt Stretch
#10: Pole Stretch for the Back

Exercizes

Additional Suggestions

For even more suggestions, check out the following articles. The videos in the table below, featuring Michael Volkin, can also be used as a guide:

  • Huffington Post: "10 Easy At-Work Workouts".8 This HP article has many excellent suggestions for movements you can do just about anywhere, anytime, even while still sitting. For example, you can perform leg extensions while remaining seated. Or, keeping your back erect, lift your knees above the chair, squeezing your abdominal muscles, and hold for as long as you can.
  • Washington Post: "A Workout At Work?"9 12 Movements suggested by experts in body mechanics include marching triceps kicks, standing hamstring curls, knee lifts, desk pushups, side lunges, and more. This article includes animated graphics demonstrating each easy move.
  • Greatist.com: "33 Ways To Exercise At Work".10 This list of "deskercises" is chockfull of great ideas. From wall sitting while reading, and calf-raises while standing at the printer, to discreet isometric glutes exercises like the buttock-squeeze that can be done anytime, you're bound to find several to fit into your daily work routine.
  • The Atlantic: "Workouts To Do At Work" (video).11 In an effort to bring some measure of "cool factor" to at-work workouts, Atlantic editor James Hamblin offers up an array of suggestions in this humor-filled video. As he says, while stationary jogging may raise some eyebrows, taking the stairs is always an option.
Exercizes

What Is It About Sitting That Makes It So Harmful?

Space medicine has done a lot to help us understand why sitting is so detrimental. Dr. Vernikos was in fact one of the primary doctors assigned to keep NASA astronauts from deteriorating in space. In a previous interview, she explains that the human body deteriorates at a faster speed in anti-gravity situations, and, as it turns out, sitting for an extended period of time actually simulates a low-gravity type environment!

Physical movements such as standing up or bending down, on the other hand, increase the force of gravity on your body. Again, anti-gravity environments speed up cellular deterioration, so the key is to disengage from this low anti-gravity situation as much as possible by standing up and moving about.

The problem is that our modern society and our reliance on technology has reduced or eliminated many of these opportunities for low-intensity intermittent movement and replaced it with chronic sitting, typically staring in one direction. Some people have even taken to texting other family members inside the same house instead of getting up and walking into the next room. All of this sloth-like inactivity adds up and can take years off your life by speeding up cellular deterioration.

Another Key: When You Do Sit, Use Proper Sitting Form

Other factors come into play as well of course, such as poor posture, which can affect the function of your internal organs, and the lack of blood circulation that results from lack of movement and poor sitting form. I'm convinced that, in addition to getting out of your chair frequently enough, maintaining proper posture while sitting can also make a significant difference. As posture expert Esther Gokhale, creator of the Gokhale Method, explains:

"In our stack sitting method (which is really healthy sitting, primal sitting, if you will), you have your behind out behind, but not exaggeratedly. That's very important. Then your bones stack well and the muscles alongside your spine are able to relax... Now when you breathe, your whole spine lengthens and settles, lengthens and settles. There's this movement which stimulates circulation and allows natural healing to be going on as you sit.

If you sit poorly, whether relaxed and slumped or upright and tense, you've lost all of that. So do we want to blame [all the adverse health effects] on sitting, or do we want to blame it on the poor sitting form? That's my question."

To learn more about proper posture, and how to sit properly, please see my interview with Esther (Gokhale Method hyperlinked above), in which you'll also find video demonstrations of healthy stack sitting techniques. Using proper posture while seated, combined with frequent interruptions where you stand up and, ideally, perform some of the intermittent movement exercises suggested above, can go a long way toward counteracting the ill effects associated with sitting.

What Are Your Recommendations?

If this is a topic that interests you half as much as it does me, I would encourage you to bookmark this page and play with the concept. I've only been experimenting with this approach for about half a year and am in constant revision mode.

There are loads of exercises that one can do in one to two minutes that would serve to interrupt the sitting that causes damage. So if you find one you really like, please create a video of it; upload the video to YouTube, and then post your link in the comments below. We will review all the entries and add exercises to the videos above that we feel would serve to help you avoid the damage caused by chronic sitting.

http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2014/04/11/intermittent-movement.aspx


In Conclusion…..Offering

Move it or Lose it! We will be offering a movement workshop, at a place to be announced, during the month of June. It will be held Wednesdays from 6-8pm. This workshop is about movement so it will incorporate movement throughout each session. Enough theory and video will be presented to support each concept but we will be in motion most of the time.

George Glass LMT, NCTMB has been teaching massage and movement since 1995. His experience ranges from teaching workshops similar to the one he is offering to teaching professional ski instructors (PSIA) and Athletic Trainer’s ATC’s on the subject. In addition George has been teaching Sports Massage at Massage Therapy schools and to peer Massage Therapy professionals since 1995 as well.

Currently, George and his wife Lori Ann own a private Massage Therapy practice, Glass & Glass Bodywork in Durango, Colorado. George & Lori Ann use an integrative approach to chronic pain, injury rehabilitation and post-surgical soft tissue issues implementing a comprehensive treatment plan that includes an initial health intake, physical assessment, hands-on therapy and concludes with follow-up care.

Massage Therapy Improves Posture

From board meetings to bunko groups, there's a lot of tension these days-as in neck and back tension. "Our necks and backs hurt, and poor posture is the No. 1 culprit," says Janice Novak, M.S., author of the book, Posture, Get it Straight! (Perigee Trade, 1999).

When you hunch forward, your body isn't properly aligned. "Not only does poor posture look bad, but it forces some muscles to work incredibly hard all day long while others get weaker," Novak says. Poor posture can put you in other slumps, too. "When you slouch, you're pressing down on your internal organs, which affects digestion," Novak says, adding that circulation and breathing capacity can take a hit too.

Unlike other bad habits, poor posture can be relaxing to correct. Why? Massage can help get your body back on track. Allowing the body to reinforce healthy and natural movements can be one of the most beneficial aspects of massage therapy.

Massage can relax and loosen the muscles made sore by bad posture, allowing your body to position itself in its natural-and pain-free-posture.

With ongoing massage the muscles are loosened, joints are relaxed providing greater freedom of movmenent, and pressure points are relieved. This allows the body to position itself in a healthy and natural posture, therefore avoiding the movements and positions developed over time as a reaction to the pain.

Benefits of Improved Posture

  • Muscles are loosened and relaxed
  • Joints enjoy greater freedom
  • Pressure points are relieved

Integrative Massage Therapy

Our “definition” of Integrative Massage Therapy reads like this: The use of multiple massage modalities integrated into a single session in order to gain the greatest therapeutic benefit for each individual. These modalities may include but are not limited to the following: Myofascial Release (MFR), Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT), Lymphatic Drainage Therapy (LDT), Multi-Directional Cross Fiber Friction (CFF), Cranial Sacral Therapy (CST), Trigger Point Therapy (TPT), Therapeutic Stretching and Therapeutic Exercises.

MFR:

Myofascial release is the three-dimensional application of sustained pressure and movement into the fascial system in order to eliminate fascial restrictions and facilitate the emergence of emotional patterns and belief systems that are no longer relevant or are impeding progress. First, an assessment is made by visually analyzing the human frame, followed by the palpation of the tissue texture of various fascial layers. Upon locating an area of fascial tension, gentle pressure is applied in the direction of the restriction. Myofascial release is an effective therapeutic approach in the relief of cervical pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, scoliosis, neurological dysfunction, restriction of motion, chronic pain, and headaches.

NMT:

This comprehensive program of soft-tissue manipulation balances the body’s central nervous system with the musculoskeletal system. Based on neurological laws that explain how the central nervous system initiates and maintains pain, the goal is to help relieve the pain and dysfunction by understanding and alleviating the underlying cause. Neuromuscular therapy can help individuals who experience distortion and biomechanical dysfunction, which is often a symptom of a deeper problem. It is also used to locate and release spasms and hypercontraction in the tissue, eliminate trigger points that cause referred pain, rebuild the strength of injured tissues, assist venous and lymphatic flow, and restore postural alignment, proper biomechanics, and flexibility to the tissues.

LDT:

Lymph Drainage Therapy (LDT) is unique in that healthcare professionals learn how to palpate the lymphatic flow. As they develop their skills, they can then identify the rhythm, direction, and quality of the lymphatic flow. Advanced practitioners will be able to precisely map the lymphatic flow to find alternate pathways for drainage. Developed by Bruno Chikly, MD, Lymph Drainage Therapy evolved from years of training in traditional medicine, Asian medical practices, and manual therapies. (Definition provided by The Upledger Institute.)

CFF:

Developed for the treatment of soft tissue lesions by the British osteopath, Dr. James Cyriax, deep transverse friction effectively reduces fibrosis and encourages the formation of strong, pliable scar tissue at the site of healing injuries. This technique, also known as cross-fiber frictioning, reduces the crystalline roughness that forms between tendons and their sheaths that can result in painful tendonitis. It can also prevent or soften myofascial adhesions.

CST:

Craniosacral therapy is a gentle, noninvasive method of evaluating and enhancing the function of a physiological body arrangement called the craniosacral system. Developed by John E. Upledger, DO, OMM, this manual therapy enhances the body’s natural healing processes and has proven effective in treating a wide range of medical problems associated with pain and dysfunction. The roots of this therapy are in cranial osteopathy, developed by Dr. William G. Sutherland. The craniosacral system consists of the membranes and cerebrospinal fluid that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord. It extends from the bones of the skull, face, and mouth--which make up the cranium--down to the sacrum or tailbone.

Since this system influences the development and function of the brain and spinal cord, any imbalance or dysfunction in the craniosacral system could cause sensory, motor, or neurological disabilities. These problems may include chronic pain, eye difficulties, scoliosis, motor-coordination impairments, learning disabilities, and other dysfunctions of the central nervous system. Craniosacral therapy encourages the body’s natural healing mechanisms to improve the functioning of the central nervous system, dissipate the negative effects of stress, and enhance health and resistance to disease.

The craniosacral therapy practitioner uses a light touch to assist the natural movement of fluid within the craniosacral system. Therapists generally use only five grams of pressure, roughly the weight of a nickel, to test for restrictions in various parts of the craniosacral system. It’s often possible for the evaluation alone to remove the restriction and allow the system to correct itself.

TPT:

Trigger point massage therapy is specifically designed to alleviate the source of the pain through cycles of isolated pressure and release. In this type of massage for trigger point therapy, the recipient actively participates through deep breathing as well as identifying the exact location and intensity of the discomfort.

The results and benefits of trigger point massage are releasing constricted areas in the muscles thus alleviating pain. You can experience a significant decrease in pain after just one treatment. Receiving massage with trigger point therapy on a regular basis can help naturally manage pain and stress from chronic injuries.

Therapeutic Stretching:

We incorporate one of the following stretching techniques with our clients:

Active Isolated Stretching (AI):

Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) is one of the methods of stretching most used by today's athletes, massage therapists, personal/athletic trainers, and professionals. Active Isolated Stretching allows the body to repair itself and also to prepare for daily activity. The Active Isolated Stretching technique involves the method of holding each stretch for only two seconds. This method of stretching is also known to work with the body's natural physiological makeup to improve circulation and increase the elasticity of muscle joints and fascia. There are several ways of learning about Active Isolated Stretching (AIS).

Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF):

Is a set of stretching techniques commonly used in clinical environments to enhance both active and passive range of motion with the ultimate goal being to optimize motor performance and rehabilitation.

Static Stretching: is used to stretch muscles while the body is at rest. It is composed of various techniques that gradually lengthen a muscle to an elongated position (to the point of discomfort) and hold that position for 30 seconds to two minutes. 30 seconds is the minimum duration to get the benefits of stretching, whereas two minutes is the maximum (if a position can be held for more than two minutes, a farther stretch should be performed).

Therapeutic Exercise:

DeLateur defined therapeutic exercise as bodily movement prescribed to correct impairment, improve musculoskeletal function, or maintain a state of well-being. It may vary from highly selected activities restricted to specific muscles or parts of the body, to general and vigorous activities that can return a convalescing patient to the peak of physical condition.

Therapeutic exercise seeks to accomplish the following goals:

  • Enable ambulation
  • Release contracted muscles, tendons, and fascia
  • Mobilize joints
  • Improve circulation
  • Improve respiratory capacity
  • Improve coordination
  • Reduce rigidity
  • Improve balance
  • Promote relaxation
  • Improve muscle strength and, if possible, achieve and maintain maximal voluntary contractile force (MVC)
  • Improve exercise performance and functional capacity (endurance)

Sports Injury Massage

Sports Massage should play an important part in the life of any athlete whether they are injured or not. Massage has a number of benefits including physical, physiological and psychological.

Sports massage can help maintain the body in generally better condition, prevent injuries and loss of mobility, cure and restore mobility to injured muscle tissue, boost performance and extend the overall life of your sporting career.

Pre & Post Surgery

Chronic Pain

Postural Restoration

Injury Massage Therapy

Rehabilitating any injury can be a tiring and frustrating process. While the main goal of physical rehabilitation is to increase strength and flexibility, it often ends before the area has been returned to its full pre-injury state.

Massage plays an important role as a supplement to standard injury rehabilitation procedures. By encouraging circulatory movement, relaxing muscles, releasing adhesions, decreasing swelling, massage helps the body pump more oxygen and nutrients into tissues and vital organs. This allows the rehabilitating injured area(s) to become more flexible and heal at an accelerated rate.

Massage Therapy for Boomers...

03/13/2014
1 Comment

Recently released in... Boomers & Beyond Editorial
Article (3.1.14 Edition)
Bodywork for Boomers

We are proud to be Baby Boomers, especially when the alternative is being associated with generation X or Y. I am happy to be a Boomer simply because it implies movement. Let's face it, generation X or Y refers to chromosomes which are not very romantic nor does it fit our extraordinarily active community.

We are all actively aging and are in need of healthy support mechanisms to help us grow older with athletic grace or simply gracefully. Massage is one of those support mechanisms that can help us achieve overall well-being.

Massage is not only effective in maintaining our health it may also help us regain some functions that seem lost to us forever. Massage promotes blood circulation, reduces pain, increases joint mobility and can improve posture.

Therapeutic massage gets you going! It helps to stretch tight muscles, remove restrictions and helps to restore motion. One client reported that "massage finds the spots and releases them before they become injuries."

Massage is an experience that affects the whole body. It eases pain and reduces stress which is one reason why massage is employed more and more in health care. In addition to pain and stress reduction massage is incorporated in many injury and pre and/or post surgery protocols. Massage can also be valuable in a chronic pain management program.

A growing number of health care plans reimburse for massage and more health care providers are prescribing Massage Therapy for a variety of reasons.

We Baby Boomers do not want to stop being active. However, we may need some assistance in continuing to have an active lifestyle. Massage Therapy is a common sense tool and with knowledge and understanding of the role massage can play for you it can help you lead a happy, healthy and active lifestyle.

How can we help you?

Glass & Glass Bodywork practices an integrative approach to chronic pain, injury rehabilitation, postural restoration and pre and post surgical soft tissue issues. We take our clients through a comprehensive treatment plan beginning with an initial health intake and physical assessment, hands-on therapy and conclude with follow-up care.

Glass & Glass Bodywork accepts some insurance and all credit cards. Our office has ample parking and is wheel chair accessible.

To schedule your appointment:
George or Lori Ann
970-403-5453
or g.g.bodywork@gmail.com
on the web at www.glassbodywork.com.

References

Eisenberg, D. et al, "Unconventional Therapies in the United States: Prevalence, costs and patterns of use. New England Journal of medicine, 1993 Jan28; 328(4); 246-52.

http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/Peters1.html
http://www.massagetherapy.com/articles/index.php/article_id/1607/Bodywork-for-Boomers
http://abmp.com

Comments

Erin

Ok, so I am not a Boomer, I'm one of those crazy, plugged-in Gen Ys. That said, I would recommend Glass & Glass Bodywork to everyone who wants massage to make a difference in how they feel. I have recommended G&G Bodywork to many people (including my parents) who complain of lingering stiffness and pain. I will pass this post along to others.

Thanks George & LoriAnn for your excellence!

Most Common Injury for Massage Therapists...

01/18/20140 Comments

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What is the most common injury that you have seen?

This was a question posed to us by one of our clients this past week. We had to think about 2 seconds. Although low back pain is the number one complaint of the American public and generally the most common reason people seek out a Massage Therapist, it was not the answer.

As our practice is focused on injury rehabilitation, pre- and post-surgical care and pain management we see a diverse clientele.

In addition, since we also take on worker's compensation and other insurance based cases we see many injuries and surgeries that do not fit the norm. The answer to the question does fit the norm however...

What is the most common injury we have seen lately? Currently we have four post-operative total knee replacement clients. This is the new norm as the baby boomers are hitting their (our) stride.

Orthopedic Surgeons did approximately 719,000 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/insurg.htm total knee replacements this year alone. Astoundingly total knee replacements are expected to hit 3.48 million by 2030 http://www.uptodate.com/contents/total-knee-replacement-arthroplasty-beyond-the-basics.

Why Massage Therapy as a treatment for post-operative total knees?

Immediately post-surgery either an Orthopedic Surgeon or Physical Therapist is going to refer a patient to us in order to address the swelling (edema). This helps to expedite the recovery time post surgery by using techniques termed either Lymphatic Drainage Therapy (LDT) or Manual Lymph Drainage (MLD) depending on where a Massage Therapist has received their training.

Either technique (aforementioned) is designed to promote the removal of lymph from the "injured" area. I.e. it is used to remove swelling. This helps to decrease pain from swelling and compression, increase range of motion, and support the rehabilitation efforts of the Physical Therapist.

Somewhere in the 8-12 week range Massage Therapy becomes beneficial in creating additional range of motion, bringing muscle spasms to rest, as well as aiding the removal of scar tissue (adhesions). This is accomplished through the usage of a number of techniques.

We have found that a combination of basic Swedish Massage, a tissue "warming" technique, in combination with more focused Myofascial Release (MFR), Neuromuscular Therapy (NMT), Multi-Directional Cross Fiber Friction (CFF) and Therapeutic Stretching accomplish the task at hand very well.

These are the techniques that we generally defer to; however, we do incorporate other hands-on techniques as well.

In addition to the knee itself, we additionally want to address the compensatory patterns that have developed from pre-operative imbalances and post-operative compensations.

Finally, we want to send clients home with their desired goals met. A pain free state of being with full function as the client defines full function for themselves.

Stay Healthy,
George & Lori Ann Glass

Is Spring Here?

04/19/2013
1 Comment

There are signs of spring as the buds are on the trees in Durango. Activities are shifting from winter to spring. We have had quite a few changes ourselves which parallel spring growth and budding new activity.

We, the four of us, are out riding bikes and we have had our first camping trip of the season to Moab over spring break. I am registered for the Iron Horse Classic so I am training for that iconic ride on Memorial Day weekend. Lori Ann and I have also joined a coed recreation soccer league spurring on our roots in the sport.

In the past month I was re-planted as a Delegate for the Colorado Chapter of the AMTA, our professional organization. Lori Ann and I have continued our Cranial Osteopathy training with Dr. Paul Lee. We will be completing this seven month training in mid May. This has and will bring an extroadinary new dimension to our work.

To those who are unaware of exactly what insurances and forms of payment we accept let me clarify for you. We are capable of taking on Anthem Blue Cross patients as well as Worker's Compensation and Motor Vehicle Accidents. Worker's Compensation and Motor Vehicle Accidents must be accompanied by a doctor's prescription.

We accept cash, checks, and all major credit cards along with these insurances as form of payment. In addition we are setting up custom gift certificates through Spa Boom online where you will be able to use PayPal to make your purchases.

Happy spring. look out the window.....those are geese!

George & Lori Ann Glass

100 Jenkins Ranch Road, Suite E2 (Mountain View TLC), Durango, CO 81301 Phone: 970-403-5453 Fax:970-444-7043 info@glassbodywork.com